Monitoring with SNMP, Part 1: Fundamentals of SNMP

SNMP is a protocol for conveying information and controlling devices over a network. SNMP can be used in two ways:

  • Active: a device sends a command to set a parameter or request information for another device
  • Passive: a device sends an alert (called a trap) to another device, which is configured to receive traps and do something with the information.

The “payload” of an SNMP message is called an Object Identifier, or OID. An OID is an ordered list of non-negative numbers, such as:

1.3.6.1.2.1.1.3.0

The sequence is hierarchical, starting with the highest-level object and progressing to lower-level objects. The above sequence corresponds to:

iso(1) org(3) dod(6) internet(1) mgmt(2) mib-2(1) system(1) sysUpTime(3) 0

When this command is sent to a device, it will return the uptime of the device.

The translation between the numerical sequence and the human-readable form is stored in a text file called a Management Information Base, or MIB. The format of the MIB is defined in RFC 2578. Some MIB files are standard and contain object IDs that are recognized by almost all devices. Device manufacturers also provide custom MIB files in which they define specialized object IDs for a particular device. Unfortunately, some devices don’t have MIB files, and you will have to query the device to see what objects it supports and decipher what they mean.

In Part 2 of this series, I will use active SNMP to monitor infrastructure.

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